MediShout secures £1 million Seed investment led by Episode 1 Ventures

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MediShout, the app for frontline hospital staff to resolve facilities and equipment issues, has closed a £1 million seed round, led by Episode 1 Ventures. 

Every day, NHS frontline staff are forced to waste time on logistics, equipment and facilities issues in hospitals. By not having working equipment in the right place, at the right time, procedures are delayed, frontline staff are depleted and patients suffer. The impact is huge. The Journal of Nursing Times reported that a third of nurses wasted two hours per shift just looking for missing kit or stock.

Born of frustrating personal experience, MediShout was founded by an NHS surgeon, Ash Kalraiya: 


“As a surgeon, I have all too often been delayed by items like lightbulbs in the theatre being broken, faulty equipment or not having the right stock when I need it. We founded MediShout to stop such frustrating issues from getting in the way of patient care. Our ultimate vision is to use AI and digital technologies to transform our hospitals into smart-buildings that run smoothly.”

The MediShout app is the first “one-stop shop” being used in NHS hospitals to connect staff, equipment suppliers and service maintenance teams. Frontline staff are now able to report and resolve operational issues directly and easily using the app. By using data and AI, Medishout predicts and prioritises issues in the hospital’s facilities and equipment to ensure that patients can receive the best possible care. 

The app is already being used by 6 hospitals and several equipment suppliers, and with this new round of funding, the team plans to expand to over 20 hospitals in 18 months. 

Independent research conducted by health economists, suggests that using MediShout could save NHS hospitals £1m every year.

MediShout has already helped improve PPE allocation during the peak of Covid-19.

During Covid-19, frontline staff are more reliant than ever on functioning equipment, logistics and infrastructure to treat patients. They need ventilators, stock for blood tests, PPE and functioning kit to perform surgeries. Without MediShout, when things go wrong with any of these, staff struggle to report problems and get them resolved. 

Medishout’s Chief Product Officer, Ali Nehme Bahsoun, is also a doctor-turned-entrepreneur who previously led Product at Digital Surgery, which was also backed by Episode 1 Ventures and was acquired by Medtronic earlier this year.

Carina Namih, Partner at Episode 1 Ventures adds: 

“Hospital facilities have been left behind by digital innovation for too long. As doctors and product designers, this team really understands how technology and AI can help frontline hospital staff be more effective. We are hugely excited by the positive impact that MediShout will have”

About the company: 

www.MediShout.co.uk
MediShout Ltd was founded so digital technology could improve operational efficiency in hospitals; allowing staff to provide better patient care. The MediShout app is the first “one-stop shop” in healthcare to connect staff, equipment suppliers and service maintenance teams, so issues such as faulty IT, broken equipment or missing stock can be instantly resolved. Crowdsourcing the insights of frontline staff and using AI to predict problems in advance, is enabling MediShout to transform service delivery and improve the Covid-19 response of many hospitals. 

CEO, Ash Kalraiya:

Ash is an Orthopaedic Surgeon training at Imperial College London. Whilst he has worked in the NHS for a decade, his passion for trauma and “fixing broken bones” has also taken him to work in South Africa and Malawi, where he operated as a World Orthopaedic Concern Fellow. He is an advocate of surgical education and has created international teaching programmes for trauma. Ash founded MediShout after witnessing hospital infrastructure and logistical problems preventing best patient care, for example, when he had to cancel operations due to a broken theatre light bulb or had an anaesthetised patient waiting while he was fixing a faulty printer. 

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Safiya Marzook

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